UTAH CORRECTIONAL INDUSTRIES


VISION

Building a better community through career development.

MISSION

Utah Correctional Industries is dedicated to public safety through innovative career building, community partnerships, and quality production to develop successful people.

CORE VALUES

Courage; Responsibility; Innovation; Ethical Operations; Self Reliance.

Correctional Industries, or inmate work programs, have been a part of prison structure and life since the territorial prison of the late 1800s.

Early work consisted of chain gangs and later involved manufacturing license plates and producing signs. Today, Utah Correctional Industries is a division of the Utah Department of Corrections. It operates 12 work programs at the state’s two prison facilities with approximately 400 inmate work participants producing products and services for state and local government agencies.

Product lines include office furniture and seating, printing, signs, license plates, textiles, silk screening, and embroidery. Services include inmate commissary, document scanning and data entry, and construction.

UCI was created as a separate division of the UDC in 1985. It was established with the legislative intent to accomplish four objectives:

Reduce offender recidivism: UCI works to provide inmates work opportunities to help them succeed upon release from prison. This is accomplished through allowing offenders the ability to make successful choices by providing them meaningful jobs in a real-world business environment. Through the teaching of job skills and positive work ethics, it has the ability to make lasting changes.

Train incarcerated offenders in general work habits and skills that increase their employment prospects when released from prison: The legislature has illustrated that it is in the best interest of the State of Utah to develop job opportunities to further enhance the rehabilitation of inmates. The Legislature further finds that a proper means to accomplish this is through opportunities created from Utah Correctional Industries.  Work Programs for Prisoners U.C.A. 64-9b-1.  UCI has developed operations that provide training and skills through hands-on experience and industry standard instruction. Similar to life outside the prison, inmates fill out employment applications for current job availabilities. Those that meet the minimum qualifications are interviewed. Job placement is determined by an offender’s history, privilege level, and performance in the interview. Once given a work opportunity, inmates are expected to learn and understand the operation, machinery, and work philosophy. They are given every opportunity to learn the latest standards and industry practices. Inmates can learn manufacturing techniques, operations management, purchasing, computer programs, customer service, construction trades, and many other skills. UCI provides leading edge technology, machinery, and trained professional staff to enhance the inmate’s skills and performance.

Be a self-supporting organization: All expenditures necessary for the administration of UCI — including salaries, overhead expenses, acquisition of assets, and raw materials needed for production — are paid out of the Utah Correctional Industries Fund. This fund is based on retained earnings and revenues generated through the sale of products and services. These funds are separate from the Department of Corrections, from which UCI has no direct fiscal impact or influence.

Generate enough revenue from the sale of goods and services to cover all operating expenses: By selling products and services to state and local government subdivisions and efficiently managing internal operation procedures costs, UCI is able fulfill its financial operating obligations. UCI manufactures products and services that are desired and necessary for government business to function. Research is done to ensure that market trends are identified and that customer needs are met. As with any business, UCI strives to be competitive in all aspects, including price, quality, lead-time, customer service, product diversification, and availability.

UCI strives to market current products and services by continually researching potential markets for expansion. The more work obtained from government agencies, the greater the demand will be for additional inmate work participants to help accomplish UCI’s mission.

Correctional Industries, or work programs at the Utah State Prison have been a part of prison structure and life since the territorial prison of the late 1800’s.  Early work consisted of chain gangs, and later involved manufacturing license plates and producing signs.  Today, Correctional Industries is a division of the State Department of Corrections that operates 14 work programs with approximately 400 inmate work participants producing products and services for state and local government agencies.

Utah Correctional Industries (UCI) was created as a separate division of the Department of Corrections in 1985.  UCI was established with the legislative intent to accomplish four objectives: 1) to reduce inmate recidivism, 2) to train inmate offenders in general work habits, work skills, and specific training skills that increase their employment prospects when released from prison, 3) to be a self-supporting organization, and 4) generate enough revenue from the sale of goods and services to cover all operating expenses.

First, decrease the Department of Correction’s inmate recidivism rate. UCI works to provide as many inmate work opportunities to succeed upon release from prison.  This is accomplished through allowing inmates the ability to make successful choices by providing them meaningful jobs in a real world business environment that provides job skills training, positive work ethics, and the ability lasting changes.

Second, UCI teaches and trains inmates in general work habits, work skills, and specific job skills that increase their employment prospects when released from prison.  The legislature has illustrated that it is in the best interest of the State of Utah to develop job opportunities to further enhance the rehabilitation of inmates of the Utah State Prison. The Legislature further finds that a proper means to accomplish this is through opportunities created from Utah Correctional Industries.  Work Programs for Prisoners U.C.A. 64-9b-1. UCI has developed operations that provide training and skills through hands experience and industry standard instruction.  Similar to life outside the prison, inmates fill out applications for employment based on current job availability and inmates that meet the minimum qualifications are interviewed. Job placement is determined by their history, privilege level and performance in the interview. Once an inmate is given a work opportunity, they are expected to learn and understand the operation, machinery, and work philosophy. Inmates are given every opportunity to learn the latest standards and industry practices. Inmates can learn manufacturing techniques, operations management, purchasing, computer programs, customer service, construction trades, and many other skills. UCI provides leading edge technology, machinery, and trained professional staff to enhance the inmate’s skills and performance. These opportunities are provided to help fulfill the legislative intent by enhancing the rehabilitation of inmates of the Utah State Prison.

Third, UCI is a self-supporting organization.  All expenditures necessary for the administration of Utah Correctional Industries, including the payment of all salaries, necessary overhead expenses, acquisition of assets, and raw materials needed for production shall be paid out of the Utah Correctional Industries Fund. This fund is based on retained earnings and revenues generated through the sale of products and services.  These funds are separate from the Department of Corrections, from which UCI has no direct fiscal impact or influence.

Fourth, UCI needs to generate enough revenue from the sale of goods and services to cover all operating expenses.  In order to be self-supporting, UCI must be focused on generating positive revenue.  By selling products and services to state and local government subdivisions and efficiently managing internal operation procedures costs are minimized and revenue is generated to fulfill financial operating obligations.  UCI manufactures products and services that are desired and necessary for government business to function.  Research is done to ensure that market trends are identified and that customer needs are met through innovative products and desired services.  As with any business that is profit oriented UCI strives to be competitive in all aspects: price, quality, lead-time, customer service, product diversification, and availability.

In meeting the needs of state and government agencies, UCI manages 14 operations that provide extensive product lines and services.  Product lines include: office furniture and seating, printing, signs, license plates, textiles, silk screening, and embroidery.   Services include: inmate commissary, green thumb nursery, document scanning and data entry, and construction.

UCI strives to market current products and services by continually researching potential markets for expansion.  The more work obtained from government agencies, the greater the demand will be for additional inmate work participants to help accomplish UCI’s mission.


GOVERNING STATUES AND INFORMATION

UCI was created by the Utah Legislature (Utah Correctional Industries Act, 1985, Utah Code 64-13a), to provide value and cost savings to state agencies. This value has been extended to other government agencies, including counties, cities, school districts, special service districts and qualifying nonprofit organizations.

State Agencies and other procurement units shall purchase goods and services provided by UCI as provided in Section 63G-6a-804 of Utah State Code. Procurement units may not purchase any goods or services provided by UCI from any other source unless an exception is granted by the UCI Director and the Director of State Purchasing.

Some of the other governing statues are: Inmate Employment, Utah Code 64-13-16, Labor at Correctional Facilities, Utah Code 64-13-19 and Work to be voluntary, Utah Code 64-9b-4.

UCI STATE PURCHASING CONTRACTS

Click on the contract number to view the State Purchasing Contract.

  • Data Entry, Document Scanning & Micrographics Services UCI 1869
  • Embroidery & Silk Screening Services UCI 328
  • Furniture Manufacturing UCI 022
  • General Printing Services UCI 380
  • Printing Services:    Business Cards PD 2195   Carbonless Printing UCI 492
  • Seating, Upholstery & Re-Upholstery UCI 022
  • Signs Road, Office & ADA UCI 118
  • Textiles, Sewing & Inmate Clothing UCI 374

State Purchasing Flow Chart

UCI Utah State Use Law

List of UCI State Contracts

UCI SHOWROOM

Open Monday thru Thursday

8:00 am to 4:00 pm MST

Closed State and Federal Holidays.

14072 South Pony Express Road, Draper, Utah.

(801) 576-7700

UCI Showroom Directions